Winning on ‘Straya Day

A last minute guide to celebrating Australia Day in Sydney

Aussies are renown straight talkers, especially when it comes to naming our stuff. When a native species of snake is brown, we’ll call it a Brown Snake. When a mountain range appears to have a blue tinge when viewed from afar, we’ll call it the Blue Mountains.

So while the Americans have Independence Day and the French have Bastille Day, we Aussies named our national day of celebration… Australia Day. Tadaaa… we are seriously uncomplicated.

Oh but there are a few exceptions… Aussies can seem pretty elaborate and at times downright complex when it comes to celebrating our public holidays.

Skeptical African Kid MemeSo in the spirit of Australia Day – a celebration of all things great about this country – SIBT Students are proud to present this handy last-minute guide to winning on Australia Day in Sydney.
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Speaking “Strayan” 101

Speaking “Strayan” is something us Australians are very proud of, and we can certainly understand why anyone would wish to learn. Look, it’s a complicated language in which there are very few rules, but it does require a comprehensive understanding of short words and twisted sentences. Put them all together and you got the language “strayan”.

Learning another language takes a long time and is often very difficult (as a failed student of year 8 French, I can concur with this statement), so in an effort  to help you learn “Strayan”, I’m just going to throw you the basics. Keep it “short and sweet” as they say.

 Key “Strayan” Words Everyone Should Know:

 

Roadie: a beverage that is consumed en route.

“Mate, it’s a long walk. I’d bring a roadie or two.”

 

Sheila: A female. However, if you go around calling every girl you meet Sheila, you’ll probably end up getting slapped.

“I just got slapped by a Sheila!”

 

Deadset: Another word for seriously or absolutely.

“You got slapped by a Sheila?”
“Yer, deadset!”

 

Chook: Chicken.

“Love, have you fed the chooks this morning?”

 

Reckon: Think.

“What do you reckon about Sheila drinking that roadie?”

 

Rock up: Arrive or turn up.

“Do you reckon he will even rock up tonight?”

 

Whoop Whoop: Middle of nowhere.

“Mate, he lives in the middle of Whoop Whoop, deadset.” 

 

No Worries: Not a problem.

“Hey thanks for cookin’ the chook tonight.”
“No worries mate.”

 

Shindig: Party or event.

“Wanna come over to me place tonight mate?”

“Nah, can’t, I got that shindig at Garys. And I’m not trekking out to Whoop Whoop.”

aussie-slang-570x411

If you aren’t sure if you’re doing it right, remember this: Two syllables are more than enough for any word, just keep chopping till you get there. Then throw a vowel on the end like “o” or “ie” and you should be right.

Eg.       Dave → Davo

Monday → Mondie

Tracksuit → Trackies

Afternoon → Arvo

Breakfast → Breakie

Barbeque → Barbie

Avocado → Avo

If you can master all of the above, you’ve pretty much got the whole language under your belt. Deadset.

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